What are chocolate desserts like in the world

  • Chocolate is rich, sweet, and goes well with almost anything.
  • It is one of the most popular desserts in the world.
  • Every country has a chocolate dish, from gooey kladdkaka in Sweden to airy cabbages in Nigeria.

Here is a transcript of the video.

Chocolate is rich, sweet, and goes well with almost anything. It is one of the most popular desserts in the world. From brigadeiro in Brazil to tiramisu in Italy, we take a look at chocolate desserts from around the world.

Belgium
Belgium is literally the chocolate capital of the world, a title it has held since 1912, when a pharmacist put marzipan in a chocolate blanket to sell to patients. Nowadays, Belgians have perfected the treat, wrapping tempered chocolate with all kinds of delicious fillings, from dried fruits and caramel nuts to sweet creams.

Germany
Schwarzwälder kirschtorte, or Black Forest cake, takes its name from the sour cherry kirsch that is dipped into each layer of dark chocolate cake. Kirsch-soaked black cherries are layered between fresh whipped cream, before the cake is topped with fresh cherries and dark chocolate shavings for a sweet and sour, alcoholic slice.

Mexico
Champurrado is a Mexican hot chocolate infused with a stick of cinnamon, thickened with masa and sweetened with a pinch of piloncillo for an ultra-thick, rich cup of cocoa, perfect for warming up on cold nights.

Brazil
The brigadeiros are named after a 1940s Brazilian political candidate who was known to be quite handsome. This chocolate dessert was created for his fundraisers. A combination of sweetened condensed milk, butter, and cocoa powder creates a sweet, gooey ball that is rolled into chocolate chips for a small snack.

France
Notably one of the most difficult desserts to nail, chocolate soufflés date back to 1783. The delicate dessert combines melted dark chocolate with chewy egg whites, sugar and egg yolk, then cooked until ‘so that it is perfectly risen for a soft and airy treat.

Nigeria
In Nigeria, soufflés are not only a staple street food, but an essential party snack. Chocolate puffs combine cocoa powder with a leavened dough full of nutmeg and cardamom, which is rolled into a ball and fried. The finished donut is crispy, yet stretchy and chewy.

Poland
Babka originated in Poland when leftover challah dough was combined with fillings on Passover, but it wasn’t until large Jewish populations moved to New York that chocolate became the filling of choice. Layered bread is chewy yet dense and perfect any time of the day, from breakfast to midnight snack.

Japan
Nama alludes to the freshness of this chocolate treat. The crème fraîche is mixed with dark chocolate to form a thick ganache, which is refrigerated before being cut into squares and sprinkled with a thick layer of cocoa powder. It should be served slightly chilled for a creamy, decadent bite that melts in your mouth.

Italy
Tiramisu pairs coffee and chocolate for a perfectly bittersweet treat after dinner. The layered Italian dessert begins with a row of crispy boudoirs soaked in coffee and rum, followed by a thick layer of creamy mascarpone and hazelnut, and finished with a coating of cocoa powder.

United States
Four decades older than chocolate chip cookies, the brownie is a staple dessert for all occasions, from barbecues to school lunches to weddings. Whether you prefer them dense and mushy or chewy and gooey, brownies use powdered and / or melted chocolate for the perfect portable treat.

South Africa
Malva is a sweet and chewy South African dessert that doesn’t have to include cocoa, but does if you want that extra-chocolate richness. In addition to the standard ingredients for the cakes, you will find apricot jam, orange zest and a fine semi-sweet chocolate sauce.
Like all great puddings, it is served with a scoop of ice cream.

Canada
A three-layered no-bake dessert, Nanaimo bars are the most decadent treats to make. The crispy base is made with cocoa powder, graham crackers, almonds and coconut. The middle layer is bursting with sweetness with a mix of cream and vanilla creme, and the whole thing is topped with a glossy chocolate ganache.

Sweden
In Swedish, kladdkaka means ‘sticky cake’ which is the perfect description of this gooey chocolate cake. The simple one-pot recipe incorporates melted chocolate in eggs, sugar, wheat flour, and a ton of butter for a melted, sticky slice of paradise that’s served on a daily coffee break called a fika.

Jamaica
If you’ve been to the Caribbean before, it’s almost certain you’ll come away with a black cake, also known as rum cake. A chocolate rum cake incorporates unsweetened melted chocolate into the batter with dark rum and coffee. Once cooked and cooled, the cake is dipped in even more dark rum.

Turkey
Mosaic cake is a must-have after-dinner dessert in Turkey. Shortbread cookies called petiteurre are pounded into small squares, then combined with sugar, butter, cocoa powder and bitter chocolate. The mixture is poured into a loaf pan before the cookies are baked and sliced, revealing the tiled pattern inside.

Australia
Lamingtons were created in the late 1800s in honor of the Governor of Queensland, and afternoon tea isn’t complete without them these days. The raspberry jam is sandwiched between two soft pieces of vanilla sponge cake, then the cake is cut into small squares, covered with a thin, sweet chocolate frosting and rolled in desiccated coconut.

So which chocolate desserts do you want to try? Are there any that we missed?

EDITOR’S NOTE: This video was originally posted in July 2021.


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